Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Liu, W;Xu, XL;McGoff, NM;Eaton, JM;Leahy, P;Foley, N;Kiely, G
2014
May
Journal of Environmental Management
Spatial and Seasonal Variation of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) Concentrations in Irish Streams: Importance of Soil and Topography Characteristics
Validated
WOS: 2 ()
Optional Fields
IRELAND TRENDS MATTER EXPORT CATCHMENTS PEATLANDS DYNAMICS RELEASE WATER PEAT
53
959
967
Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations have increased in many sites in Europe and North America in recent decades. High DOC concentrations can damage the structure and functions of aquatic ecosystems by influencing water chemistry. This study investigated the spatial and seasonal variation of DOC concentrations in Irish streams across 55 sites at seven time occasions over 1 year (2006/2007). The DOC concentrations ranged from 0.9 to 25.9 mg/L with a mean value of 6.8 and a median value of 5.7 mg/L and varied significantly over the course of the year. The DOC concentrations from late winter (February: 5.2 +/- A 3.0 mg/L across 55 sites) and early spring (April: 4.5 +/- A 3.5 mg/L) had significantly lower DOC concentrations than autumn (October: mean 8.3 +/- A 5.6 mg/L) and early winter (December: 8.3 +/- A 5.1 mg/L). The DOC production sources (e.g., litterfall) or the accumulation of DOC over dry periods might be the driving factor of seasonal change in Irish stream DOC concentrations. Analysis of data using stepwise multiple linear regression techniques identified the topographic index (TI, an indication of saturation-excess runoff potential) and soil conditions (organic carbon content and soil drainage characteristics) as key factors in controlling DOC spatial variation in different seasons. The TI and soil carbon content (e.g., soil organic carbon; peat occurrence) are positively related to DOC concentrations, while well-drained soils are negatively related to DOC concentrations. The knowledge of spatial and seasonal variation of DOC concentrations in streams and their drivers are essential for optimum riverine water resources management.
NEW YORK
0364-152X
10.1007/s00267-014-0259-1
Grant Details